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    Aldus Manutius, Founder Aldine Press  
Aldus Pius Manutius, the Latinised name of Aldo Manuzio —sometimes called Aldus Manutius, the Elder to distinguish him from his grandson, Aldus Manutius, the Younger—was an Italian humanist who became a printer and publisher when he founded...
 
    Gutenberg Bible, First Real Printed Book  
In the mid-15th century Johann Gutenberg invented a mechanical way of making books. This was the first example of mass production. He was born about 1400, the son of a rich family in Mainz, Germany. While still a young man, he left for poli...
 
    Jakob Fugger, German Banker  
Jakob Fugger of the Lily also known as Jakob Fugger the Rich or sometimes Jakob II. Fugger was a major merchant, mining entrepreneur and banker of Europe between ca. 1495-1525. He was a descendant of the Fugger merchant family located in th...
 
    Johann Froben, Printer / Publisher  
Johann Froben was a famous printer and publisher in Basel. He was friends with Erasmus, who lived in his house when in Basel, and not only had his own works printed by him from 1514, but superintended Froben's editions of Jerome, Cyprian, T...
 
    Bartholomeus Welser, German Banker  
Prince Bartholomeus Welser was a German banker. He was the head of the banking firm of Welser Brothers, who claimed descent from the Byzantine general Belisarius. They possessed great riches, and Bartholomeus was created a prince of the emp...
 
    Christophe Plantin, Printer  
Christophe Plantin was an influential Renaissance humanist and book printer and publisher. Besides the polyglot Bible, Plantin published many other works of note, such as editions of St. Augustine and St. Jerome, the botanical works of Dodo...
 
    Hendrik Goltzius, Dutch Engraver  
Hendrik Goltzius was a Dutch printmaker, draftsman, and painter. He was the leading Dutch engraver of the early Baroque period, or Northern Mannerism, noted for his sophisticated technique and the "exuberance" of his compositions. According...
 
    Willem Jansz Blaeu, Publisher of Maps  
Willem Janszoon Blaeu: Author, printer, and publisher of geographic maps and globes, which he signed until 1621 with the Latinized name of Guljelmus Caesius. Pupil and friend of Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), from whom he acquired the astronomica...
 
    Jacques Specx, Founder Dutch Japan Trade  
Jacques Specx was a Dutch merchant, who founded the trade on Japan and Korea in 1609. Jacques Specx received the support of William Adams to obtain extensive trading rights from the Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu on August 24, 1609, which allowed h...
 
    Joan Blaeu, Publisher of Maps  
Joan Blaeu was the eldest son of Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638). It was under the control of Joan that the Blaeu printing press achieved lasting fame by moving towards the printing of maps and expanding to become the largest printing pre...
 
    Tulip Mania, First Speculative Bubble  
Tulip mania was a period in the Dutch Golden Age during which contract prices for some bulbs of the recently introduced and fashionable tulip reached extraordinarily high levels and then dramatically collapsed in February 1637. It is ge...
 
    Nicolaes Witsen, Mayor Amsterdam  
Nicolaas or Nicolaes Witsen was mayor of Amsterdam thirteen times, between 1682-1706. In 1693 he became administrator of the VOC. In 1689 he was extraordinary-ambassador to the English court, and became Fellow of the Royal Society. In his f...
 
    Grigory Stroganov, Largest Russian Landowner  
Grigory Dmitriyevich Stroganov was a Russian landowner and statesman, the most notable member of the prominent Stroganov family in the late 17th century-early 18th century, a strong supporter of the reforms and initiatives of Peter the Grea...
 
    Thomas Coram, Foundling Hospital London  
Captain Thomas Coram was a philanthropist who created the London Foundling Hospital to look after unwanted children in Lamb's Conduit Fields, Bloomsbury. It is said to be the world's first incorporated charity. The Foundling Hospital cha...
 
    John Law, The Mississippi Bubble, 1720  
John Law was a Scottish economist who believed that money was only a means of exchange that did not constitute wealth in itself and that national wealth depended on trade. He was appointed Controller General of Finances of France under the...
 
       
         
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