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1500 years

   
The Bible, sometimes called the Holy Bible, can refer to one of two closely related religious texts central to Judaism and Christianity—the Hebrew or Christian sacred Scriptures respectively.

Modern day Judaism recognizes a single set of canonical books known as the Tanakh, also called Hebrew Bible, traditionally divided into three parts: the Torah ("teaching" or "law"), the Nevi'im ("prophets"), and the Ketuvim ("writings").

The Bible as used by the majority of Christians includes both the Rabbinic Hebrew Scripture of the Old Testament and the New Testament. The canonical composition of the Old Testament is somewhat disputed in Christianity. Protestants hold all of the books of the Hebrew Bible to be canonical and include them in what they call the Old Testament. Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox additionally consider the deuterocanonical books, a group of Jewish books, to be a canonical part of their Old Testament. The New Testament is comprised of the Gospels ("good news"), the Acts of the Apostles, the Epistles (letters), and the Book of Revelation.

The term "bible" is sometimes used to refer to any central text of a religion, or a comprehensive guidebook on a particular subject.
 
 
The Bible, sometimes called the Holy Bible, can refer to one of two closely related religious texts central to Judaism and Christianity—the Hebrew or Christian sacred Scriptures respectively.

Modern day Judaism recognizes a single set of canonical books known as the Tanakh, also called Hebrew Bible, traditionally divided into three parts: the Torah ("teaching" or "law"), the Nevi'im ("prophets"), and the Ketuvim ("writings").

The Bible as used by the majority of Christians includes both the Rabbinic Hebrew Scripture of the Old Testament and the New Testament. The canonical composition of the Old Testament is somewhat disputed in Christianity. Protestants hold all of the books of the Hebrew Bible to be canonical and include them in what they call the Old Testament. Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox additionally consider the deuterocanonical books, a group of Jewish books, to be a canonical part of their Old Testament. The New Testament is comprised of the Gospels ("good news"), the Acts of the Apostles, the Epistles (letters), and the Book of Revelation.

The term "bible" is sometimes used to refer to any central text of a religion, or a comprehensive guidebook on a particular subject. More

 
    Eruption of Thera, Santorini
  Eruption of Thera, Santorini
Thera, or the modern island of Santorini, located sixty-nine miles north of the island of Crete in the Aegean Sea, was devastated by a volcanic eruption sometime in the 15th century BC. The eruption was one the the most powerful in the past 10,000 ye...
 
    Moses, Ten Commandments
  Moses, Ten Commandments
Moses was, according to the Hebrew Bible, a religious leader, lawgiver, and prophet, to whom the authorship of the Torah is traditionally attributed. Also called Moshe Rabbenu in Hebrew "Moses our Teacher/Rabbi", is the most important prophet in Juda...
 
    Saul, 1st king of Israel
  Saul, 1st king of Israel
Saul was the first king of the united Kingdom of Israel (reigned 1047 - 1007) according to the Hebrew Bible. He was anointed by the prophet Samuel and reigned from Gibeah. He committed suicide during a battle with the Philistines at Mount Gilboa, dur...
 
    David, 2nd King of Israel
  David, 2nd King of Israel
David was the second king of the united Kingdom of Israel according to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. He is depicted as a righteous king, although not without fault, as well as an acclaimed warrior, musician and poet (he is traditionally credited wi...
 
    Solomon, 3rd King of Israel
  Solomon, 3rd King of Israel
Solomon (Reign: 971 - 931 BCE, Born: unknown, Died: c.931 BCE) is described in the Hebrew Bible and later in the Qur'an, where he is described as a Prophet. The biblical accounts identify Solomon as the son of David. He is also called Jedidiah in the...
 
    Jerusalem, Capital of Israel
  Jerusalem, Capital of Israel
Jerusalem is the capital of Israel and its largest city in both population and area, with a population of 763,800 residents. The city has a history that goes back to the 4th millennium BCE, making it one of the oldest cities in the world. Jerusalem i...
 
    The Torah, The First Five Books of the Bible
  The Torah, The First Five Books of the Bible
The Torah is the Hebrew name for the five books of Moses—the Law of Moses or the Pentateuch, the first five books of the Bible. The Torah is believed by Orthodox Jews to have been handed down to Moses on Mt. Sinai and transmitted by him to the Jews....
 
    Necho II, Pharaoh 26th Dynasty
  Necho II, Pharaoh 26th Dynasty
Necho II was a king of the Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (610 BCE – 595 BCE). Necho II is most likely the pharaoh mentioned in several books of the Bible (see Hebrew Bible / Old Testament). The Book of Kings states that Necho met King Josiah of the K...
 
    Nebuchadnezzar II, Ruler of Babylon
  Nebuchadnezzar II, Ruler of Babylon
Nebuchadnezzar II was a ruler of Babylon in the Chaldean Dynasty, who reigned c. 605 BC – 562 BC. According to the Bible, he conquered Judah and Jerusalem, and sent the Jews into exile. He is credited with the construction of the Hanging Gardens of B...
 
    Zoroaster, Founder Zoroastrianism
  Zoroaster, Founder Zoroastrianism
Zoroaster was a religious reformer of ancient Persia (now Iran) and the founder of the pre-Islamic religion of Zoroastrianism. Thought to have lived about 300 years before Alexander the Great, Zoroaster (Zarathustra in Greek) had a religious vision w...
 
    Cyrus The Great of Persia
  Cyrus The Great of Persia
Cyrus II of Persia, commonly known as Cyrus the Great and also called Cyrus the Elder by the Greeks, was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire. Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East, expanded va...
 
    The Cyrus Cylinder
  The Cyrus Cylinder
The Cyrus Cylinder, discovered in 1879 and now in the British Museum, is one of the most famous cuneiform texts, because it was once believed that it confirmed what the Bible says: that in 539 BCE, the Persian conqueror Cyrus the Great had allowed th...
 
    Herod the Great, King of Israel
  Herod the Great, King of Israel
Herod, also known as Herod I or Herod the Great, was a Roman client king of Israel. He was (descended from converts to Judaism) serving as a servant first. Described as A madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis. He is commonly conf...
 
    Virgin Mary, Mother of Jesus
  Virgin Mary, Mother of Jesus
Mary of Nazareth often referred to by Christians as the Virgin Mary or Saint Mary, was a Jewish woman of Nazareth in Galilee, identified in the New Testament as the mother of Jesus Christ. Muslims also refer to her as the Virgin Mary or Syeda Mariam,...
 
    Philo of Alexandria, Jewish Philosopher
  Philo of Alexandria, Jewish Philosopher
Philo, known also as Philo of Alexandria, Philo Judaeus, Philo Judaeus of Alexandria, Yedidia and Philo the Jew, was an Hellenistic Jewish philosopher born in Alexandria. Philo used allegory to fuse and harmonize Greek philosophy and Judaism. His met...
 
    Jesus Christ, of Nazareth
  Jesus Christ, of Nazareth
Jesus (6–4 BC to 30–33 AD), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus of Galilee, is the central figure of Christianity, whom the teachings of most Christian denominations hold to be the Son of God. Christianity regards Jesus as the awaited Mes...
 
    Saint Paul, The Apostle
  Saint Paul, The Apostle
Paul the Apostle, original name Saul of Tarsus, was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of Christ to the first-century world. He is generally considered one of the most important figures of the Apostolic Age. In t...
 
    Saint Peter, Prince of the Apostles
  Saint Peter, Prince of the Apostles
Saint Peter (died c. 64 AD), also known as Simon Peter, according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus Christ, leaders of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church considers him to be the first pope, ordained by J...
 
    Mary Magdalene, Disciple of Jesus
  Mary Magdalene, Disciple of Jesus
Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. She is considered by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican churches to be a saint, with a feast day of J...
 
    John the Baptist, Forerunner of Jesus
  John the Baptist, Forerunner of Jesus
John the Baptist was an itinerant preacher and a major religious figure in Christianity, Islam (known as Yahya ibn Zakariyya), the Bahá'í Faith, and Mandaeism. John is described as having the unique practice of baptism for the forgiveness of sins....
 
    John the Apostle
  John the Apostle
John the Apostle was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus. Christian tradition identifies him as the author of several New Testament works: the Gospel of John, the Epistles of John, and the Book of Revelation. Many modern scholars believe that John th...
 
    Rashi, French Rabbi, Comments on Talmud and Tanakh
  Rashi, French Rabbi, Comments on Talmud and Tanakh
Shlomo Yitzchaki, today generally known by the acronym Rashi, was a medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud and commentary on the Tanakh. Acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a con...
 
    Martin Luther, Initiator Protestant Reformation
  Martin Luther, Initiator Protestant Reformation
Martin Luther was a German priest and professor of theology who initiated the Protestant Reformation. Strongly disputing the claim that freedom from God's punishment of sin could be purchased with money, he confronted indulgence salesman Johann Tetz...
 
       
 
         
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