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    Sacagawea, Lewis and Clark Expedition  
Sacagawea, also Sakakawea or Sacajawea, was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition achieve each of its chartered mission objectives exploring the Louisiana Purchase. With the expedition, between 1804 and 1806, she...
 
    Lord Byron, English Poet of the Romantics  
Lord Byron was an English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement. Among Byron's best-known works are the lengthy narrative poems Don Juan and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and the short lyric She Walks in Beauty. He is regarded as...
 
    Don Carlos of Spain, 1st Carlist  
The Infante Carlos of Spain was the second surviving son of King Charles IV of Spain and of his wife, Maria Luisa of Parma. As Carlos V he was the first of the Carlist claimants to the throne of Spain. He is often referred to simply as 'Don...
 
    Arthur Schopenhauer  
German philosopher. Rejecting the idealism of Hegel, Schopenhauer's Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung employed Kant's notion of the noumenal self as the foundation for a comprehensive account of human nature, in contrast to the phenomenal...
 
    Christian Thomsen, Originator of the Three-age System  
Christian Jürgensen Thomsen was a Danish antiquarian who developed early archaeological techniques and methods. In 1816 he was appointed head of 'antiquarian' collections which later developed into the National Museum of Denmark in Copen...
 
    The Constitution of the United States  
The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. The Constitution, originally comprising seven articles, delineates the national frame of government. Its first three articles entrench the doctrine of...
 
    Storming of the Bastille, 14th of July  
The Storming of the Bastille in Paris occurred on 14 July 1789. While the medieval fortress and prison known as the Bastille contained only seven prisoners, its fall was the flashpoint of the French Revolution and it subsequently become an...
 
    The French Revolution  
The French Revolution was a period of radical social and political upheaval in France from 1789 to 1799 that profoundly affected French and modern history, marking the decline of powerful monarchies and churches and the rise of democracy an...
 
    Georg Ohm, Discovery of Ohm's Law  
Georg Simon Ohm was a German physicist. As a high school teacher, Ohm began his research with the recently invented electrochemical cell, invented by Italian Count Alessandro Volta. Using equipment of his own creation, Ohm determined that t...
 
    King Leopold I of Belgium  
Leopold of Saxe-Coburg, was the first king of Belgium, or more correct of the Belgians, according to the constitution of that country, since July 21, 1831. In 1830 the people of Greece offered Leopold the Greek crown, but he declined. Af...
 
    A Vindication of the Rights of Woman  
Mary Wollstonecraft discusses how women are to be kept ignorant of all knowledge and only to be valued for their physical charms (almost every ad on TV/in print). The examples of her contemporaries that she quotes are frighteningly familiar...
 
    The White House, US Presidents  
For two hundred years, the White House has stood as a symbol of the Presidency, the United States government, and the American people. Its history, and the history of the nationís capital, began when President George Washington signed an Ac...
 
    Champollion, Deciphering Hieroglyphics  
Anyone who has studied ancient Egypt will be familiar with Jean Francois Champollion, The Father of Egyptology. He was, after all, credited with deciphering hieroglyphics from the Rosetta Stone and thus giving scholars the key to understand...
 
    Jules Dumont d'Urville, French Explorer  
Jules Sébastien César Dumont d'Urville was a French explorer, naval officer and rear admiral, who explored the south and western Pacific, Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica. In honour of his many valuable chartings, the D'Urville Sea...
 
    John Tyler, 10th US President, 1841-1845  
John Tyler, 10th President of the United States (1841-1845), signaled the last gasp of the Old Virginia aristocracy in the White House. Born a few years after the American Revolution in 1790 to an old family from Virginia's ruling class, Ty...
 
       
 
         
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