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    Cause, Principle and Unity, Bruno  
Giordano Bruno's notorious public death in 1600, at the hands of the Inquisition in Rome, marked the transition from Renaissance philosophy to the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century. This volume presents new translations of Ca...
 
    Balthazar Gerards kills William l  
Balthazar Gerards (1557-1584) was the assassin of the Dutch independence leader, William the Silent. Gerards was born in Vuillafans, France, at number 3 in the street now called Rue Gerard. He came from a Roman Catholic family with 11 child...
 
    Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange  
Frederick Henry, prince of Orange; son of William the Silent by Louise de Coligny. He became stadtholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands upon the death (1625) of his brother Maurice of Nassau. As a minor prince heading a federati...
 
    Tirso de Molina, Creator of Don Juan  
Tirso de Molina, pseudonym of Gabriel Téllez, one of the outstanding dramatists of the Golden Age of Spanish literature. The most powerful dramas associated with his name are two tragedies, El burlador de Sevilla (“The Seducer of Seville...
 
    Caspar Barlaeus, Theologian  
Caspar Barlaeus was a Dutch polymath, humanist theologian, poet, and historian. Born Caspar (Kaspar) van Baerle in Antwerp, Barlaeus' parents fled the city when it was occupied by Spanish troops shortly after his birth. They settled in Zal...
 
    Bredero, Dutch Dramatist & Poet  
Gerbrand Adriaensz Bredero is considered the major Dutch poet of his generation, particularly for his spontaneous love sonnets. The first Dutch master of comedy, Bredero was an important innovator; he drew upon classical elements as well as...
 
    Cardinal Richelieu, Premier of France  
Cardinal Richelieu was extremely intelligent and at the age of nine was sent to College de Navarre in Paris. In 1602, at age seventeen he began studying theology seriously. In 1606 he was appointed Bishop of Luçon, and in 1622 Pope Gregory...
 
    Jacques Specx, Founder Dutch Japan Trade  
Jacques Specx was a Dutch merchant, who founded the trade on Japan and Korea in 1609. Jacques Specx received the support of William Adams to obtain extensive trading rights from the Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu on August 24, 1609, which allowed h...
 
    Heinrich Schütz, German Composer  
Heinrich Schütz was a German composer and organist, generally regarded as the most important German composer before Johann Sebastian Bach and is often considered to be one of the most important composers of the 17th century along with Claud...
 
    Jan Pieterszoon Coen, Governor VOC  
Jan Pieterszoon Coen was an officer of Dutch East India Company (VOC) in the early seventeenth century, holding two terms as its Governor-General in the Dutch East Indies. He was long considered a national hero in the Netherlands, for provi...
 
    Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset  
Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset, was a politician, and favourite of King James I of England. In 1606, most likely at the arrangement of Overbury, Carr happened to break his leg at a tilting match, at which the king was present. According...
 
    Joost Van Den Vondel, Dutch Poet and Playwright  
Joost van den Vondel was a Dutch poet, writer and playwright. He is considered the most prominent Dutch poet and playwright of the 17th century. His plays are the ones from that period that are still most frequently performed, and his epic...
 
    Thomas Hobbes, Philosopher  
Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury was an English philosopher, best known today for his work on political philosophy. His 1651 book Leviathan established the foundation for most of Western political philosophy from the perspective of social contra...
 
    Johannes van der Beeck (Torrentius), Still Life Master  
Johannes (Jan) Symonsz van der Beeck was a Dutch painter also known by his alias Johannes Torrentius. ("Torrentius" is a Latin equivalent of the Beeck surname, meaning "of the brook" or "of the river".) Despite his reputation as a still...
 
    The Faerie Queene, Spenser  
Epic poem that was published between 1590 and 1609 by Edmund Spenser. It is the central poem of the Elizabethan period and is one of the great long poems in the English language. A celebration of Protestant nationalism, it represents infide...
 
       
 
         
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